Welcome to the 1776 Unites Library!

We are proud to introduce our 1776 Unites Library, stocked with seminal books that influenced the thinking of our founder, Scholars, Achievers and team! These works cover a broad variety of subjects from historical and autobiographical, to contemporary looks at key subjects — often with perspectives you will not find elsewhere.

Please hover over titles to read our descriptions of them before clicking to check out more on Amazon. Books marked with a quill in the top right are those authored by our founder, Scholars or Achievers, and are worth your attention!

Thank you for being here and helping share in our journey to build a culture of resilience and embrace of American values within every community in our country! And, for those planning — these books make great holiday gifts for your loved ones!


  • Undoctrinate: How Politicized Classrooms Harm Kids and Ruin Our Schools

    Bonnie Kerrigan Snyder

  • Please Stop Helping Us

    Jason L. Riley

    Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed

    Jason L. Riley

    Why is it that so many efforts by liberals to lift the black "underclass" not only fail, but often harm the intended beneficiaries? Wall Street Journal writer Jason L. Riley examines how well-intentioned welfare programs are in fact holding black Americans back, and have been doing so for decades. From minimum wage laws to affirmative action, well-intentioned policy has wreaked havoc on vulnerable black communities.

  • American Awakening: Identity Politics and Other Afflictions of Our Time

    Joshua Mitchell

  • How The Other Half Learns

    Robert Pondiscio

  • Suicide of the West

    Jonah Goldberg

  • Up from Slavery

    Booker T. Washington

  • Hillbilly Ellegy

    J.D. Vance

  • Dust on a Road

    Zora Neale Hurston

    Dust on a Road: A Memoir

    Zora Neale Hurston

    A classic memoir from a Black American iconoclast. Anthropologist, folklorist, novelist and essayist Zora Neale Hurston tells her story from rural Florida to Howard University and her early work as a writer and scholar.

  • How Innovation Works

    Matt Ridley

  • Seeing Like a State

    John C. Scott

    Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed

    John C. Scott

    Why do well-meaning schemes for improving the human condition fail? In his book Seeing Like a State, James C. Scott examines grand utopian plans that tragically misfired, such as the “Great Leap Forward” in China, collectivization in Russia, and Le Corbusier’s urban planning theory actualized in Brasilia, among others. Scott dissects the four conditions common to all authoritarian state planning fiascoes in this fascinating read that is all too pertinent to the modern welfare state.

  • My Grandfather's Son

    Clarence Thomas

    My Grandfather's Son: A Memoir

    Clarence Thomas

    In his striking autobiography, My Grandfather’s Son, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas recounts his extraordinary journey from an impoverished, broken home in the segregated South to a seat on the nation’s highest court. Authentic and uncompromising, Thomas delves into the adversity and injustices he’s overcome, including his path as a native Gullah speaker breaking into the mainstream in America.

  • The Future Once Happened Here

    Fred Siegal

    The Future Once Happened Here: New York, D.C., L.A., and the Fate of America's Big Cities

    Fred Siegal

    In this eye-opening look at racial politics and unflinching indictment of urban America’s decline, Fred Siegel portrays the stark realities of three major American cities—New York, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC—in The Future Once Happened Here. Siegel argues that free market forces were undermined and a culture of dependency created, to the detriment of "best laid plans." Siegel’s arguments may fall short for some, but there is plenty to weigh and consider in this study of a complex story of urban decline in modern-day America.

  • The Alternative

    Mauricio Miller

    The Alternative: Most of What You Believe About Poverty is Wrong

    Mauricio Miller

    “They never ask me what I’m good at.” Those words from Mauricio Miller’s mother—referring to all the professional “helpers” she interacted with— showed him why both public and private anti-poverty programs fail: they focus on people’s weaknesses and failures instead of their talents and aspirations. Miller established an entirely different—and extremely successful—approach, investing in people’s ambitions and demonstrated strengths and treating them as contributors rather than passive recipients of charity.

  • Ghettoside

    Jill Leovy

    Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America

    Jill Leovy

    What is the truth of what's happening in our urban combat zones today in America? Los Angeles Times reporter Jill Leovy goes in-depth into South Central LA and concludes that in reality, communities need more law enforcement, not less -- specifically of violent crimes. A must-read for those interested in criminal justice issues.

  • Black Rednecks and White Liberals

    Thomas Sowell

    Black Rednecks & White Liberals

    Thomas Sowell

    In his provocative and eye-opening book Black Rednecks and White Liberals, conservative intellectual giant Thomas Sowell dismantles long-prevailing assumptions about blacks and slavery, Jews and Nazi Germany, and education and achievement. Sowell offers a deeply researched, thought-provoking exploration of various facets of race and culture, dispelling cliches and questioning beliefs in this unabashedly candid and insightful treatise that shows how white liberals attempt to turn "dysfunctional black redneck culture" into an immutable symbol of racial identity.

  • Charter Schools and their Enemies

    Thomas Sowell

    Charter Schools and their Enemies

    Thomas Sowell

    In Charter Schools and their Enemies, leading conservative Thomas Sowell makes a convincing case for why charter schools offer better educational outcomes for students than conventional public schools. Sowell takes on the teachers’ unions, liberal educators, and elected officials who insist on the status quo and seek to quash the growth and success of charter schools in the U.S.

  • The Coddling of the American Mind

    Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff

    The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure

    Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff

    A must-read warning to American parents, educators and academics from two professors on the learned fragility and helplessness of an entire generation of American students. If our future leaders are not equipped to handle conversations around difficult subjects -- how can they tackle our problems?

  • Dignity

    Chris Arnade

    Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America

    Chris Arnade

    A poignant examination of the dignity, striving, and resilience that define the people in America’s “Back Row.” Author Chris Arnade takes the reader on a cross-country journey to explore those left behind. From drug dens and homeless tent camps to the corner McDonald’s, Arnade reveals hidden-in-plain-sight stories that cut across lines of race, ethnicity, and religion. Along the way, he exposes the "Front Row" elites who mock the Back Row’s life choices and values.

  • My Bondage and My Freedom

    Frederick Douglass

  • The Triple Package

    Amy Chua & Jed Rubenfeld

    The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America

    Amy Chua & Jed Rubenfeld

    Why are some groups so disproportionately successful in America, despite facing economic, cultural, and language barriers? Amy Chua (of Tiger Mother infamy) and her husband Jed Rubenfeld argue that high-performing groups teach their children impulse control, a sense of specialness or superiority, coupled with an insecure need to prove themselves to the wider world. Their argument—and the evidence they use to support it—flies in the face of popular American beliefs about equality and self-esteem.

  • Race Experts

    Elizabeth Lasch-Quinn

    Race Experts: How Racial Etiquette, Sensitivity Training, and New Age Therapy Hijacked the Civil Rights Revolution by Elizabeth Lasch-Quinn

    Elizabeth Lasch-Quinn

    First published almost a decade ago, this early analysis of racial "sensitivity" programs has received new attention since the protests of 2020. Author Elizabeth Lasch-Quinn, Professor of History at Syracuse University, examines the role of questionable therapeutic practices and New Age beliefs in undermining the "color blind" ideal of the early civil rights movement and giving rise to contemporary diveristy, equity and inclusion traning.